The Feminist Lyme Patient

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A New Chapter. Maybe.

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[content warning: suicide ideation, sexual assault, emotional abuse, street harassment, online abuse]

If you’ve read my blog for a while, you know a bit about me and the things I face dealing with a great deal of violence online (some in response to this blog existing; some in response to me

Filed under signal boost

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Imagine that based on that diagnosis, a judge decides that you are unfit for custody of your child. Imagine that you have been the primary caregiver for your child or children and then someone who has never seen you interact with your children, who has never entered the home you run decides that you are not as able to take care of your children as your spouse.

This happens all across the United States and it is wrong.

Disability and Discrimination in Custody Battles

By Massachusetts State Representative Paul Heroux, advocating for H1379, a bill that makes it more difficult for family courts to prejudicially decide against parents with disabilities.

(via disabilityhistory)

Filed under disability law courts

47 notes

Some of us have a very personal view of the world. We say that what happens to us in our lives as women happens to us as individuals. We even say that any violence we have experienced in our lives as women —for instance, rape or assault by a husband, lover, or stranger—happened between two individuals. Some of us even apologize for the aggressor—we feel sorry for him; we say that he is personally disturbed, or that he was provoked in a particular way, at a particular time, by a particular woman.

Men tell us that they too are “oppressed.” They tell us that they are often in their individual lives victimized by women— by mothers, wives, and “girlfriends. ” They tell us that women provoke acts of violence through our carnality, or malice, or avarice, or vanity, or stupidity. They tell us that their violence originates in us and that we are responsible for it. They tell us that their lives are full of pain, and that we are its source. They tell us that as mothers we injure them irreparably, as wives we castrate them, as lovers we steal from them semen, youth, and manhood—and never, never, as mothers, wives, or lovers do we ever give them enough.

And what are we to think? Because if we begin to piece together all of the instances of violence—the rapes, the assaults, the cripplings, the killings, the mass slaughters; if we read their novels, poems, political and philosophical tracts and see that they think of us today what the Inquisitors thought of us yesterday; if we realize that historically gynocide is not some mistake, some accidental excess, some dreadful fluke, but is instead the logical consequence of what they believe to be our god-given or biological natures; then we must finally understand that under patriarchy gynocide is the ongoing reality of life lived by women. And then we must look to each other—for the courage to bear it and for the courage to change it.

Our Blood, by Andrea Dworkin

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

Filed under andrea dworkin gynocide

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…[E]ven though women are expected to enjoy being used and being hurt, women resist; women fight back; women organize; women are brave; women go up against male power and stop it in its tracks; women fight institutions of male dominance and weaken them; women create social and political conflict, so that male power is challenged and hurt; women retaliate against rapists and batterers and pimps; women infiltrate male systems of power; women change laws to benefit women and increase our rights; women provide secret refuge for battered women and above-ground advocacy for rape victims and abortions for pregnant women who need help; women create work and wealth for other women to subvert the economic hold men have over women; sometimes women kill; women sit-in and picket and commit civil disobedience to destroy pornographers and militarists; women sue to stop sex discrimination; women claim more and more public space to change the configurations of public power; feminists keep refining the targets, so that we attack male power where it is most vulnerable and where we can best amass collective strength in our respective countries; feminists go at male power where it is most dangerous, so heavy on top that it must topple over if we push hard enough; feminists keep thinking, writing, talking, organizing, marching, demonstrating, with militance and patience and a rebelliousness that burns. The fight is hard and ugly and deadly serious. Sometimes women are killed. Often, women are hurt. Vengeance against women is real, physical, economic, psychological: swift and cruel. Still: women resist, women fight back, women want to win.

Andrea Dworkin, Letters from a War Zone

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

Filed under feminists andrea dworkin

525 notes

fuckyeahfeminists:

saturdaychores:

How to make an aggressive pro-lifer stop talking: Just record him. 

LOL! But don’t they want their ~word~ to be spread everywhere? WHERE’S YOUR CONVICTION, ANTI-CHOICER?!

Filed under video anti choicers

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What You Can Do [To Name The Problem Of Male Violence]

1. Replace the phrase “violence against women,” everywhere you or your feminist organizations currently use it, with the phrase “male violence against women” or possibly “male-pattern violence against women.”

2. Specifically name the most prevalent kind of domestic violence as “male-pattern violence in the home.”

3. When writing and speaking about male-pattern violence, actively name the perpetrator or at least the gender of the perpetrator: “A man raped a woman.” Do away with expressions such as “a woman was raped,” “her rapist” and every kind of wording that focuses on rape as a problem only for women.

4. Wherever possible, present statistics about violence in ways that clearly indicate the gender of the perpetrator, not just of the victim: Instead of “Every 15 minutes a woman is raped,” which makes rape seem like a female problem, try “Every 15 minutes, a man rapes a woman.” Or better: “Every 15 minutes, a man commits a rape.”

5. Call people on their defensiveness against acknowledging male violence. Watch for the classic defenses (see Ways People Deny Male Violence) and point them out.

6. Know the statistics and cite them often.

7. Talk about male-pattern violence openly and constantly. Make sure everyone you know is aware of this particularly masculine problem. Discuss it with your children. Discuss it with male friends. Discuss it with female friends. Discuss it in classrooms, in gossip sessions, and in bars.

8. Study the phenomenon. Examine how the construction of masculinity contributes to the commission of violence. Read what researchers such as James Gilligan are finding about why men become violent.

9. Encourage men to explore and question the cult of masculinity. If you are a man, call other men on their unexamined acceptance of mainstream masculinity.

10. Don’t accept male violence. Make it stop.

Jennie Ruby, Male Pattern Violence [X] (via witchbornwitch)

(via exgynocraticgrrl)

Filed under male violence male violence against women

778 notes

The late, disabled playwright John Belluso had a theory about why actors who play disabled characters often win Oscars: It is reassuring for the audience to see an actor like Daniel Day Lewis, after so convincingly portraying disability in My Left Foot, get up from his seat in the auditorium and walk to the stage to accept his award. There is a collective “Phew” as people see it was all an illusion. Society’s fear and loathing around disability, it seems, can be magically transcended.

Disability Is Not Just a Metaphor: The entertainment industry loves disabled characters—but not disabled actors

in the meantime, if we were allowed to see more representations of people with different disabilities in film, tv, pop culture and real life, that fear & loathing would dissipate, and we’d start to see disabilities as a normal part of life.

(via disabilityhistory)

Filed under disability hollywood

1,233 notes

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I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 
Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 
According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 
People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 
Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

gradientlair:

I follow @KristyT on Twitter and she let me know about a project that she created with @tiffani (#DetroitWater) to help Detroit residents with their water costs. Their website is detroitwaterproject.org and there you can confidentially donate to cover a person’s bill. 

Detroit has the highest percentage of Black residents compared to any other major U.S. city, and as I wrote about in Black In The 99%, race is most certainly forever intertwined with class and poverty; these cannot be extracted from each other, especially in a country where its very financial system and imperialistic power would not exist without enslavement and genocide. There is no way to extract the economic violence being committed upon Detroit residents from racial histories. 

According to RH Reality Check, "in Detroit, the cost of water is nearly twice the national average, and approximately half of the city’s customers owe outstanding balances on their water bills. But let’s situate this against a broader historical and sociopolitical backdrop. By 2011, half of Detroit’s working-age population was unemployed, and only 27 percent had full-time work. Nearly one in five Detroit residents were below the poverty line. Approximately three in five children were living in households headed by single mothers (see Rose Brewer’s article on the prison industrial complex). Moreover, these statistics are significantly worse for the city’s Black and Latino residents.” 

People simply cannot go without water and while this entire situation is larger than just “unpaid bills” but are acts of violence against these residents amidst larger economic and racial disenfranchisement, with the recent 15 day suspension on the human-made drought, hopefully no other excuses can be used to harm these people if they’re able to pay the bills. This isn’t about lack of “personal responsibility” creating negligence over a “luxury” but about systemic poverty, capitalism, privatization and WATER. 

Again, if you want to support Detroit residents through a confidential donation via this fundraiser created by two thoughtful Black women, visit: detroitwaterproject.org.

Filed under signal boost